FacebooktwittermailFacebooktwittermail

Finding a way to use the macro lens creatively was a challenge for me. Sure, I could have photographed flowers and had you saying “oh look at that beautiful stamen” or “wow that pistil is just fantastic” but decided I’d challenge myself to find something less popular to photograph.  My subject of choice was a set of antique books.   My goal was to photograph them in such a way as to make the most of the textures, erring on the side of abstraction. The books are fantastic, beautiful in their lines, colors and textures. The old pages and woven covers made the lens really work for a shot. I wanted you to be able to almost feel the rough woven spines and smell the old pages. I think macro shots are the least popular and digestible to the mobile photography community when it comes to lens use, so I approached it in a way that made it interesting or at least different that the normal macro shots.  I was amazed the amount of texture the lens picked up. It performed better than I expected. I think I ended up with some pretty strong shots that had the characteristics I wanted.

Some off the cuff tips for you while shooting macro:

•be steady – whether that means bracing yourself or using a tripod of some sort, stabilize your self.
•hold your breath- I know it sounds stupid but it helps
•take lots of shots
•look for strong lines and dramatic light
•look for textures

I really enjoyed getting to know the ins and outs of the Olloclip macro lens. The picture was more clear and crisp than the other lenses I have used. I particularly love the DOF this lens renders.  My results were across the page more predictable. I also found that my camera focused more easily with this lens compared to the others I own.

Fisheye/wide angle lens

I really enjoy having the options and ease Olloclip allows the iPhone when out and about shooting. The effect the fisheye lens gives you reminds me of Alice in Wonderland with its bowed lines and bulges. It has a definite look to it and I had a blast playing with different architectural subjects. Before I started shooting I made some comparison shots just so I understood the range of each lens. This  lens will give you almost a 180 degree view in your view finder, whereas the wide angle comes close to doubling your range. Both the wide angle and fisheye bend lines so be aware of that while you are shooting and use it to your advantage. Either be ready to crop some of the photo beyond the cropping you have to do to take care of the empty “lens line” or go with the rounded effect of the fisheye.   I shot with hipstamtic so I can’t speak to how  much of  it would need to be cropped using the native camera. I found I liked the shots where I really centered on a subject more than when I took large open shots, but that is just a personal preference.

I shot mainly with hipstamatic and while that helped with the cropping it also made me focus more on what I was shooting. I tried to find high contrast subjects that would play to the lenses strong points. The above shot is taken with the fisheye lens and I was quite taken with how it made the lock look more dynamic that the regular shots that I took of it. The added dimension really gave it a life of its own. The photo below was taken with hipstamatic tinto lens and super grain and the wide angle lens. The feeling of the building almost crowding the viewer appealed to me. The lens added more character to a building  that already had a large personality.

 

 

Without a lens, the doors and a small part of the bricked windows are seen in the photo frame, as compared to what you see above. Although, I also did the shot with the fisheye I preferred the wide angle for the minimal bending of the lines.  Once again, finding a subject with good contrast to highlight I think the lens created a more dynamic image. Overall, I was happy with the results while shooting with the wide angle and fisheye. If you go into the shoot knowing the amount of effect the lens will have on the scene if definitely helps. I found myself thinking of the lens as I would a hipsta combo, meaning, which lens would work best for a certain scene. Sometimes I guessed wrong and the shot was askew other times I was pleasantly surprised.

 

About Author

Anna Cox